October

1.

Harvest your pumpkins and squashes by the end of the month.

2.

Early leeks can be lifted now because they are less hardy.

3.

Maincrop potatoes must be got out of the ground before the end of the month use a potato fork to lift them with less damage.

4.

Harvest the last of the peas and runner bean crop for this year. Leave bean roots in ground to add nitrogen back in.

5.

Plant out Spring cabbage and overwintering types of onion and garlic.

6.

Rough dig over heavy ground and leave it in lumps or ridges to be broken down gradually by the winter frosts.

7.

Be prepared to protect chard plants, spinach, winter lettuce, peas, broad beans and any other crops that you are overwintering.

November

1.

No time to rest. There is just enough daylight to clear/tidy up the allotment of any old crops in preparation for next year.

2.

Start to harvest winter cabbage, Brussels sprouts, leeks and parsnips.

3.

Snap off any yellowing  leaves at the base of brassicas to ensure that there is good air circulation around the plants.

4.

Now is a good time to plant new fruit trees and bushes. Soft fruit bushes can also be moved now if needed as well.

5.

Sow a crop of your favourite variety round seeded hardy peas or broad beans.

6.

Dig, unless your 'no dig' this is the priority job of the month the more that you can get done before the end of the year.

7.

A great time to take your tools home and give them a good clean, preserve any wood parts and sharpen them up.

December

1.

Check all stored crops and remove any showing signs of decay.

2.

Check over tall growing brassicas (kale, sprouts and broccoli) as they may need firming it or staking.

3.

If the soil is dry enough carefully hoe through the onion, garlic and spring cabbage beds.

4.

Clear old foliage and debris from rhubard beds. Then cover with fresh well rotted manure.

5.

Continue to prune apple and pear trees.

6.

If not already done thoughly clean greenhouse, polytunnel and cold frames with warm soapy water.

7.

Check on stored dahlia tubers and gladioli corms for rot or rodent damage.

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